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Technology at LHP

Technology Computer Labs
We have two technology labs.  One lab is used for instruction and the other lab is used for testing and teacher integration projects. 

Classroom Technology
Each classroom has a SmartBoard, document camera, teacher Macbook laptop, and at least two student computers, a teacher iPad, some Apple TVs, and teachers that are part of the Digital Learning Cohort share several iPad carts.
  

Educational Websites
Checkout our Student K-2 Symbaloo for links to websites that support student learning at LHP.
  
Educational Apps
Common Sense Media has excellent reviews of educational apps.  You can choose grade, subject area, and even price.  Be sure to check out: www.graphite.org

Technology Acceptable Use Policy
The CCSD provides Internet access to students and teachers at each of its schools. Our goal in providing this service is to promote educational excellence by facilitating resource sharing, innovation and communication. We believe the Internet offers vast, diverse and unique resources to both students and teachers. The Internet is an electronic highway connecting thousands of computers all over the world and millions of individual subscribers. Students and staff will have access to:

  • Electronic mail (e-mail) communication;
  • Information and news, as well as a variety of research institutions;
  • Public domain software and shareware of all types; and
  • Access to many University Library Catalogs, the Library of Congress and ERIC – a large collection of information relevant to educators and students.

With access to computers and people world wide comes the availability of material that may not have educational value in the context of the school setting. On a global network, however, it is impossible to control all materials and limit all access to information which has no educational value. CCSD firmly believes that the valuable resources and interaction available on this network far outweigh the possibility that some users may procure material that is inconsistent with the educational goals of the District. The smooth operation of the network relies upon the proper conduct of the end users who must adhere to strict guidelines. These guidelines are provided as a part of this handbook so that users are aware of their responsibilities when accessing the Internet. Any violations of these guidelines will subject the user to appropriate disciplinary action and possible denial of access to the Internet. All use of the Internet during school hours must be in support of education and research and consistent with the educational objectives of the school district. Users must have a well-defined documented reason for accessing the Internet. No "surfing is allowed.”Surfing" is the term for unstructured searches or just exploring to see what is out there. Students must have a topic, or subject, to be researched; and it must be directly related to a given assignment from one or more teachers. There should be adult supervision while any student is researching on the Internet.

Internet Terms and Conditions of Use:

  1. Purpose for Internet Use: All use of the Internet during school hours must be in support of education and research and consistent with the educational objectives of the school district. Users must have a well-defined documented reason for accessing the Internet. No "surfing is allowed.”Surfing" is the term for unstructured searches or just exploring to see what is out there. Students must have a topic, or subject, to be researched; and it must be directly related to a given assignment from one or more teachers. There should be adult supervision while any student is researching on the Internet.

  2. Maintain Network Etiquette:
    • Be polite. Do not send abusive or threatening messages to others.
    • Do not swear or use vulgarities or other inappropriate language.
    • Do not send credit card numbers, bank account numbers, social security numbers, personal addresses or personal phone numbers across the Internet.
    • The Internet is not a secure or private means of communication; you never really know who else may be “listening in.” People who operate the system have access to all mail. Messages relating to, or in support of, illegal activities may be reported to the authorities.
    • Do no disrupt network communications. Disruptions would include downloading large files, sending mass e-mail messages, transmitting virus routines, or annoying other uses.